My 2006 5 speed Subaru impreza

Synchros shot? Weird noises while shifting? Not sure what needs to be replaced?
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jessicaluv0203
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My 2006 5 speed Subaru impreza

Post by jessicaluv0203 » Sat Oct 17, 2020 12:29 pm

So i got a pretty sweet deal on this car i got it for free pretty much and after 5 months 160 thousand miles , when im letting my foot out on the clutch its like a humming or wooing sound everytime clutch engaged ive been trying to research it as its alot of money to drop the tranny in just labor ...could this be caused by a possible lack of fluid somewhere im hoping 🤞😂

jessicaluv0203
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Re: My 2006 5 speed Subaru impreza

Post by jessicaluv0203 » Sat Oct 17, 2020 12:31 pm

Im thinking it s my throwout bearing

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ClutchFork
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Re: My 2006 5 speed Subaru impreza

Post by ClutchFork » Sat Oct 17, 2020 8:16 pm

Check the level of the trans fluid. If low, top it up and see what happens to the noise. If not low and the noise does not worsen maybe it is okay to just keep driving until or if it finally gives out or a new clutch is needed.

I twice had throwout bearings come apart on me and there was no noise, no warning. Just suddenly the pedal locked up like it was bolted in place and immovable. Of course, with my stereo cranked up, I would not hear most noises. :lol:
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theholycow wrote:Why in the world would you even want to be as smooth as an automatic? Might as well just drive an automatic...

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Re: My 2006 5 speed Subaru impreza

Post by potownrob » Sat Oct 24, 2020 2:18 am

paging rope
Rope-Pusher wrote:High eye yam rope
ClutchFork wrote:...So I started carrying a stick of firewood with me and that became my parking brake.

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Re: My 2006 5 speed Subaru impreza

Post by Rope-Pusher » Mon Oct 26, 2020 1:06 pm

What you need to do is purchase a set of wheels with wire spokes. You know, the Bri'ish Sportscar look. Then, you go to the store and buy a pack of baseball cars (BONUS - Comes with a piece of gum hard enough to crack your teeth). Using wooden clothes pins, position the baseball cards so they get hit by the wheel spokes as the wheel rotates. Now, when you drive the car, you will hear the sound of power coming from your wheels and it will drown out the sound of the clutch release (A.K.A. Throw-Out) bearing.

Sometimes, a clutch release bearing will make noise only when cold, sometimes only when the pedal is released, and sometimes only when the clutch pedal is depressed (Oh, Don't be so sad - things will get better!).

If you are really lucky, the clutch release bearing will make noise at all times, even when the engine is shut off and the car is parked in the middle of a forest.

As much of a pain and expense as it is to replace the clutch release bearing, it is still less expensive than if something inside the transmission is making the noise.

Buy the whey, ewe din put any baseball cards inside the trans bye any chants?
'08 Jeep Liberty 6-Speed MT - "Last of the Mohicans"

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Re: My 2006 5 speed Subaru impreza

Post by ClutchFork » Mon Oct 26, 2020 8:53 pm

Rope-Pusher wrote:
Mon Oct 26, 2020 1:06 pm
What you need to do is purchase a set of wheels with wire spokes. You know, the Bri'ish Sportscar look. Then, you go to the store and buy a pack of baseball cars (BONUS - Comes with a piece of gum hard enough to crack your teeth). Using wooden clothes pins, position the baseball cards so they get hit by the wheel spokes as the wheel rotates. Now, when you drive the car, you will hear the sound of power coming from your wheels and it will drown out the sound of the clutch release (A.K.A. Throw-Out) bearing.

Sometimes, a clutch release bearing will make noise only when cold, sometimes only when the pedal is released, and sometimes only when the clutch pedal is depressed (Oh, Don't be so sad - things will get better!).

If you are really lucky, the clutch release bearing will make noise at all times, even when the engine is shut off and the car is parked in the middle of a forest.

As much of a pain and expense as it is to replace the clutch release bearing, it is still less expensive than if something inside the transmission is making the noise.

Buy the whey, ewe din put any baseball cards inside the trans bye any chants?
Didn't they used to sell tore up baseball cards to put in the radiator to plug big leaks?

Even if throwaway bearing is cheaper to replace, I found with the 2001 Ford Ranger it is impossible to make it work with hydraulic clutch. I want a cable clutch from now on. Do they make retro conversion kits. But I don't understand, brakes work fine with hydraulic, so what is the deal with clutches not working. Tellin ya, $1000 in parts and labor, all new hydraulics from throwaway to mastercylinder and line between and still not hold a pedal. Two shops could not make it work. The guy at the second shop said get rid of it and buy a Chevy. I did and the S10 clutch works great, even with me driving it. He said he never wants to see the Ranger again so hoped I sold it to someone up north and they hit a deer with it or something. As it is, I sold it to a hockey player and it has a baseball for a shift knob. I told him we could replace it with a hockey puck but he was not interested in that conversion.
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theholycow wrote:Why in the world would you even want to be as smooth as an automatic? Might as well just drive an automatic...

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Re: My 2006 5 speed Subaru impreza

Post by Rope-Pusher » Mon Oct 26, 2020 9:21 pm

ClutchFork wrote:
Mon Oct 26, 2020 8:53 pm
Rope-Pusher wrote:
Mon Oct 26, 2020 1:06 pm
What you need to do is purchase a set of wheels with wire spokes. You know, the Bri'ish Sportscar look. Then, you go to the store and buy a pack of baseball cars (BONUS - Comes with a piece of gum hard enough to crack your teeth). Using wooden clothes pins, position the baseball cards so they get hit by the wheel spokes as the wheel rotates. Now, when you drive the car, you will hear the sound of power coming from your wheels and it will drown out the sound of the clutch release (A.K.A. Throw-Out) bearing.

Sometimes, a clutch release bearing will make noise only when cold, sometimes only when the pedal is released, and sometimes only when the clutch pedal is depressed (Oh, Don't be so sad - things will get better!).

If you are really lucky, the clutch release bearing will make noise at all times, even when the engine is shut off and the car is parked in the middle of a forest.

As much of a pain and expense as it is to replace the clutch release bearing, it is still less expensive than if something inside the transmission is making the noise.

Buy the whey, ewe din put any baseball cards inside the trans bye any chants?
Didn't they used to sell tore up baseball cards to put in the radiator to plug big leaks?

Even if throwaway bearing is cheaper to replace, I found with the 2001 Ford Ranger it is impossible to make it work with hydraulic clutch. I want a cable clutch from now on. Do they make retro conversion kits. But I don't understand, brakes work fine with hydraulic, so what is the deal with clutches not working. Tellin ya, $1000 in parts and labor, all new hydraulics from throwaway to mastercylinder and line between and still not hold a pedal. Two shops could not make it work. The guy at the second shop said get rid of it and buy a Chevy. I did and the S10 clutch works great, even with me driving it. He said he never wants to see the Ranger again so hoped I sold it to someone up north and they hit a deer with it or something. As it is, I sold it to a hockey player and it has a baseball for a shift knob. I told him we could replace it with a hockey puck but he was not interested in that conversion.
It can be done! Our Bovine Bretheren, TheHolyCow, cobbled together his own bracketry for an external slave cylinder and had a fully-functioning hydraulic clutch release system on the Buick he converted to the Amish faith.
I would say to start at the pedal-end of the system - does the clutch pedal, moving from full up to full down, fully stroke the clutch master cylinder?
If that end is working properly, then go look at the other end. Does the slave cylinder stroke the clutch release bearing lever?
It can be that at one end or the other the bracketry is designed wrong, or bent, or the slave or master is not correctly attached,....and the cylinder travel doesn't match with the lever travel. Maybe the cylinder hits a hard stop and the lever can't travel fully. Maybe the cylinder is not in contact with the lever at the beginning of the motion. At the trans end, in the bellhousing there is typically a pivot stud for the lever, maybe with a plastic cap on the top of the ball. If the plastic cap is damaged or missing, the lever will be out of place and the slave cylinder won't be able to actuate it properly. Generally, when the vehicle left the assembly plant, the clutch release system was functional. If it is no longer functional, then something must have changed in a bad way.
Even wear of the clutch friction disk changes the release lever travel. As the disk gets thinner, the pressure plate moves toward the flywheel. This causes the fingers of the diaphragm spring to move away from the flywheel and so the release bearing also back away and so the release lever also changes position and the slave cylinder is forced to the extreme end of its travel. A well-designed clutch release system has excess travel available in the master and slave cylinders so that it is not so critical how dimensionally controlled the system is. There will be extra cylinder travel available to make up for dimensional tolerances, for lost travel due to expansion of the hydraulic lines, to adapt to a worn clutch friction disk, etc.
'08 Jeep Liberty 6-Speed MT - "Last of the Mohicans"

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Re: My 2006 5 speed Subaru impreza

Post by ClutchFork » Tue Oct 27, 2020 9:15 pm

With the Ranger it was a matter of they would bleed it and it was great for a day, then you had to start pumping the pedal. I bought quality parts, Motorcraft (think it was called blue stripe or something to signify their higher quality). the second mechanic said there are metal shavings in the master cylinder, but I could not see them. Oh that mechanic has a Harley Hog and once told me he got mad at someone in a car and pulled up next to them and kicked their door, while cruising on the road. Crazy huh. But what doe that have to do with clutches. Nothing, but it was an interesting story. He maintained the weight of the big Harley allowed him to do it. So all clutches need, no must have a liberal adjustment. The tolerances on those hycraulic clutches are way to tiny to allow much leeway. I say go back to the slave being outside the bell. After all, my name isnt Clutchfork for no reason. And those outside the bell slaves were usually adjustable. You can change out a clutch on those and not even have to bleed the hydro. I know because I did it once on the '84 F150 and it was fine.
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theholycow wrote:Why in the world would you even want to be as smooth as an automatic? Might as well just drive an automatic...

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Re: My 2006 5 speed Subaru impreza

Post by Rope-Pusher » Tue Oct 27, 2020 11:50 pm

ClutchFork wrote:
Tue Oct 27, 2020 9:15 pm
With the Ranger it was a matter of they would bleed it and it was great for a day, then you had to start pumping the pedal. I bought quality parts, Motorcraft (think it was called blue stripe or something to signify their higher quality). the second mechanic said there are metal shavings in the master cylinder, but I could not see them. Oh that mechanic has a Harley Hog and once told me he got mad at someone in a car and pulled up next to them and kicked their door, while cruising on the road. Crazy huh. But what doe that have to do with clutches. Nothing, but it was an interesting story. He maintained the weight of the big Harley allowed him to do it. So all clutches need, no must have a liberal adjustment. The tolerances on those hycraulic clutches are way to tiny to allow much leeway. I say go back to the slave being outside the bell. After all, my name isnt Clutchfork for no reason. And those outside the bell slaves were usually adjustable. You can change out a clutch on those and not even have to bleed the hydro. I know because I did it once on the '84 F150 and it was fine.
I dunno about adjustability. We designed for a net build...you bolt together parts that are to print and it will work. The last time I saw an adjustment on a hydraulic cluch release it was on a PT Cruiser - they had an adjuster for the pedal position....the master cylinder push-rod had a screw in a slot and you tightened it down to set the clutch pedal position. The master cylinder is self-adjusting to the point that it will take in or burp out fluid from the reservoir as needed. When your foot is off the pedal, master cylinder piston is fully retracted and the reservoir port is open. As you press on the clutch pedal, the first bit of motion moves the master cylinder piston past the reservoir port and then pressure starts building in the line to actuate the slave cylinder. There was no adjustment at the slave. It mounted to a bracket in one position only.
'08 Jeep Liberty 6-Speed MT - "Last of the Mohicans"

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Re: My 2006 5 speed Subaru impreza

Post by ClutchFork » Wed Oct 28, 2020 12:42 am

Rope-Pusher wrote:
Tue Oct 27, 2020 11:50 pm
ClutchFork wrote:
Tue Oct 27, 2020 9:15 pm
With the Ranger it was a matter of they would bleed it and it was great for a day, then you had to start pumping the pedal. I bought quality parts, Motorcraft (think it was called blue stripe or something to signify their higher quality). the second mechanic said there are metal shavings in the master cylinder, but I could not see them. Oh that mechanic has a Harley Hog and once told me he got mad at someone in a car and pulled up next to them and kicked their door, while cruising on the road. Crazy huh. But what doe that have to do with clutches. Nothing, but it was an interesting story. He maintained the weight of the big Harley allowed him to do it. So all clutches need, no must have a liberal adjustment. The tolerances on those hycraulic clutches are way to tiny to allow much leeway. I say go back to the slave being outside the bell. After all, my name isnt Clutchfork for no reason. And those outside the bell slaves were usually adjustable. You can change out a clutch on those and not even have to bleed the hydro. I know because I did it once on the '84 F150 and it was fine.
I dunno about adjustability. We designed for a net build...you bolt together parts that are to print and it will work. The last time I saw an adjustment on a hydraulic cluch release it was on a PT Cruiser - they had an adjuster for the pedal position....the master cylinder push-rod had a screw in a slot and you tightened it down to set the clutch pedal position. The master cylinder is self-adjusting to the point that it will take in or burp out fluid from the reservoir as needed. When your foot is off the pedal, master cylinder piston is fully retracted and the reservoir port is open. As you press on the clutch pedal, the first bit of motion moves the master cylinder piston past the reservoir port and then pressure starts building in the line to actuate the slave cylinder. There was no adjustment at the slave. It mounted to a bracket in one position only.
One shop claimed that with hydraulic clutch linkage, resurfacing the flywheel would require a shim of equal thickness as what was cut off, or the slave would not release properly. May be something to that.

I think to a large degree, if not entirely these days, cars are designed for assembly, not parts replacements. Else you would not be ripping out the dash to replace a heater core--though you kind of can't get around that with all the constraints of modern cars making packaging an art or a perverse joke when you go to work on it. My 1971 Ford Custom was a dream. You could change the heater core in 10 minutes. Just remove the hoses, take out a couple of screws and it slides out of the firewall from the engine compartment. That was in the days when 20 cats could fit under your hood for heat in the winter. Nowadays, one cat would be hard pressed to get in there, and if it did, you may need to do some disassembly to get the cat back out.
Stick shiftin since '77
theholycow wrote:Why in the world would you even want to be as smooth as an automatic? Might as well just drive an automatic...

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Re: My 2006 5 speed Subaru impreza

Post by Rope-Pusher » Wed Oct 28, 2020 9:35 am

ClutchFork wrote:
Wed Oct 28, 2020 12:42 am
Rope-Pusher wrote:
Tue Oct 27, 2020 11:50 pm
ClutchFork wrote:
Tue Oct 27, 2020 9:15 pm
With the Ranger it was a matter of they would bleed it and it was great for a day, then you had to start pumping the pedal. I bought quality parts, Motorcraft (think it was called blue stripe or something to signify their higher quality). the second mechanic said there are metal shavings in the master cylinder, but I could not see them. Oh that mechanic has a Harley Hog and once told me he got mad at someone in a car and pulled up next to them and kicked their door, while cruising on the road. Crazy huh. But what doe that have to do with clutches. Nothing, but it was an interesting story. He maintained the weight of the big Harley allowed him to do it. So all clutches need, no must have a liberal adjustment. The tolerances on those hycraulic clutches are way to tiny to allow much leeway. I say go back to the slave being outside the bell. After all, my name isnt Clutchfork for no reason. And those outside the bell slaves were usually adjustable. You can change out a clutch on those and not even have to bleed the hydro. I know because I did it once on the '84 F150 and it was fine.
I dunno about adjustability. We designed for a net build...you bolt together parts that are to print and it will work. The last time I saw an adjustment on a hydraulic cluch release it was on a PT Cruiser - they had an adjuster for the pedal position....the master cylinder push-rod had a screw in a slot and you tightened it down to set the clutch pedal position. The master cylinder is self-adjusting to the point that it will take in or burp out fluid from the reservoir as needed. When your foot is off the pedal, master cylinder piston is fully retracted and the reservoir port is open. As you press on the clutch pedal, the first bit of motion moves the master cylinder piston past the reservoir port and then pressure starts building in the line to actuate the slave cylinder. There was no adjustment at the slave. It mounted to a bracket in one position only.
One shop claimed that with hydraulic clutch linkage, resurfacing the flywheel would require a shim of equal thickness as what was cut off, or the slave would not release properly. May be something to that.

I think to a large degree, if not entirely these days, cars are designed for assembly, not parts replacements. Else you would not be ripping out the dash to replace a heater core--though you kind of can't get around that with all the constraints of modern cars making packaging an art or a perverse joke when you go to work on it. My 1971 Ford Custom was a dream. You could change the heater core in 10 minutes. Just remove the hoses, take out a couple of screws and it slides out of the firewall from the engine compartment. That was in the days when 20 cats could fit under your hood for heat in the winter. Nowadays, one cat would be hard pressed to get in there, and if it did, you may need to do some disassembly to get the cat back out.
Yeah, if you take enough meat off the face of the flywheel, the clutch cover will bolt on closer to the crankshaft end, the release bearing position will likewise move and the bearing-end of the clutch fork will need to tip toward the bearing, so the slave cylinder / cable end of the fork will move maybe 7 x as far rearward in the vehicle. If the slave cylinder or cable cannot accommodate that change in geometry, you can get into a situation where the clutch doesn't fully disengage when you depress the clutch pedal.
I think maybe usta-was the pivot stud for the clutch fork was adjustable for position and you could counter this situation, but all the pivot studs I've seen lately are fixed-length with a knurled press-in to the transmission bellhousing - not really meant to be adjustable. If one, or two, really knew what they were doing, they might be able to find a longer pivot stud, or maybe remove the one you have, put some washers on the shank and press it in to position where it would stick out more and return the slave / cable end of the fork to a reasonable facsimile of its original position.
'08 Jeep Liberty 6-Speed MT - "Last of the Mohicans"

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